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Balsamic vinegar. Good. Frozen desserts. Even better

Another use for vinegar ©Cookaroo

Have you ever washed your hair with vinegar? If you haven't, I am going to ask you to try it. It's made my hair so shiny and I suspect made it grow a bit (I might be wrong, but never mind) too.

You can use any vinegar and can do this two ways. Take a cotton ball and dab it on to your hair 15 minutes before you hit the shower. Or you can just use a capful once you've finished conditioning your hair, as your final rinse. Either ways your hair feels squeaky clean and looks super shiny.

If washing your hair with vinegar isn't your cup of tea, then perhaps you can try this at home. Strawberry Balsamic Sorbet. Good quality balsamic vinegar that makes even the not-so-sweet berries into delightful little desserts or even as an amuse-bouche. 

In India, you get strawberries only for a couple of months in the beginning of the year. One year I got so obsessed with them, that I would buy cartons of the berries, hull them and freeze them. I think I froze about 800 strawberries. They lasted me for a whole year. I'd use them in smoothies, make jam and use them as toppings for cheesecakes.

But ever since I bought my icecream maker last year, things changed for my frozen strawberries. I made icecreams, frozen yogurts and gelatos. But my favourite have always been sorbets. I find them light and refreshing and love how they feel on the tongue. I don't often get to make them, because the husband is more of a hatta-katta icecream eater. Sorbet = pooh pooh. Icecream = gooood.

So this Sunday, at this Brunch we hosted, since I knew a lot more people who'd enjoy this frozen delight would be present, I decided make a sorbet. Strawberries were an obvious choice, since they are in the market right now. The toss up was between trying out the strawberry-basil sorbet as against strawberry-balsamic. The latter won. Palate cleansing, gentle and not-too-sweet, this is really a very easy dessert to make and is truly a flavour-bomb.



Strawberry Balsamic Sorbet ©Cookaroo



Strawberry Balsamic Sorbet
Makes 600 ml

Ingredients

For the sorbet
500 gms fresh strawberries, washed, hulled and halved
50-100 gms of sugar (depending on how sweet your strawberries are)
 4 tablespoons of water
2 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon of sugar

For the crushed strawberries
100 gms of fresh strawberries washed and hulled
1 tablespoon sugar

For the balsamic drizzle
1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup water or juice (I used pureed strawberries)
2 teaspoons sugar

Method

1. Take out your ice cream maker and put in the freezer as per the manufacturers instructions.

2. In a saucepan heat sugar and water, until it dissolves. Take it off the heat and let it cool.

3. Puree 500 gms of strawberries. Pass it through a sieve to remove the seeds. Add to the sugar and water mix. Stir the balsamic vinegar into it. Cool. This is your sorbet mix.

4. In a mixing bowl, crush 100 gms of strawberries with your hands or a fork. Let it be chunky. This will add another texture to your sorbet

5. Make the balsamic drizzle by boiling together the balsamic vinegar, sugar and water/juice/puree for nearly 20 minutes or until it thickens. Let it cool.

6. Once the sorbet mix is cool, remove your ice cream maker from the freezer and let it churn for 20 minutes. Add the crushed strawberries to it and empty it into a freezer box. Drizzle the balsamic through it. Freeze overnight for best results. Or at least six hours.

7. Take it out 15 minutes before serving, so that you can get smooth scoops. This sorbet tastes best on the day it's made, otherwise lasts for three days in the freezer.

Note: If you want an extremely smooth sorbet, omit the crushed strawberry and add 2 teaspoons of vodka. I like mine slightly chunky.

Since I had made over a litre of this good stuff, I made frozen shots with the addition of vodka. I think this sorbet will make a mean daiquiri or a frozen margarita. I'm not sure who took this photograph but none the less it kept the party going.


Cheers! © Nimpipi

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